2005 Conference - Monday Concurrent Sessions 1
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Monday, October 17, 2005

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM     Concurrent Sessions (1) 

  • Energizing Public Participation in Community Decisions
    Diane U. Eisenberg, Executive Director Council on Public Policy Education; Taylor Willingham, Director, Texas Forums, LBJ Presidential Library and Museum, Sandra Hodge, Director, Office of Community Development and Public Deliberation, University of Missouri.
  • Empowering Involvement
    Gina Whitehill-Bazuik, Manager, Office of Citizen Involvement, Metro; and Kristin Hull, Project Manager, Jeanne Lawson Associates

Abstracts  

Grassroots Public Involvement:  Transportation Financing in Clark County, Washington, Jessica Stalberger, Project Manager, The JD White Company, Inc.
For over a year, The JD White Company worked with Identity Clark County (ICC) on a project designed and implemented by private citizens, the Transportation Priorities Project (TPP) II.  TPP II educated the Southwest Washington community about how transportation projects are identified, prioritized, and funded, so the community can make informed decisions about complex transportation issues. TPP II identified a core group of citizens who have made finding solutions to Clark County transportation problems a priority and involved them in the effort. Building on this grassroots momentum, ICC turned the tables on the typical planning process: the community took the lead and the jurisdictions followed.

 

Panel:  National Academy of Science’s National Research Council, moderated by Jim Creighton, President, Creighton and Creighton
The National Research Council, the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences, is currently conducting a study on Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making.  The purpose of this panel would be to inform practitioners about the study and the state of research in the field, and open up a dialogue between practitioners and researchers.  

 

Fostering Community Leadership in Toxic Cleanups:  Duwamish River, Seattle, BJ Cummings, Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition
Government and the local community are experimenting with an "enhanced" public participation model at the Duwamish River Superfund Site in Seattle, WA. Early access to information and influence, transparency, resource parity, and facilitated trust building are tools being used by agencies and communities involved in the project in order to achieve a cleanup that serves community values and gains active support. Lessons learned include: importance of providing community services (child care, meals, translation services); key role of dialogue and feedback loops; and the critical need for building positive relationships with trusted representatives. Building public participation processes that include communities as co-managers and decision-makers (proactive, not reactive) is essential to designing cleanups that serve and are supported by affected communities.  

 

Energizing Public Participation in Community Decisions, Diane U. Eisenberg, Executive Director Council on Public Policy Education; Taylor Willingham, Director, Texas Forums, LBJ Presidential Library and Museum, Sandra Hodge, Director, Office of Community Development and Public Deliberation, University of Missouri.  

The Council on Public Policy Education (CPPE) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the research and practice of deliberative democracy. CPPE provides small contracts to organizations and higher education institutions interested in providing leadership in their communities for moderator training and deliberative forums.  The purpose of this session is to introduce CPPE, its research contracts, and ways in which these contracts are being used to establish public policy institutes or centers that generate public deliberation, support civic engagement, and build community partnerships that connect the public with policy-makers to address pressing issues of local, state, and national concerns.  Sample materials will be distributed

 

Empowering Involvement, Gina Whitehill-Bazuik, Manager, Office of Citizen Involvement, Metro; and Kristin Hull, Project Manager, Jeanne Lawson Associates Finding a way to reach residents in areas without gathering places, employment centers or strong community structure is one of the biggest challenges that public involvement practitioners face.  This challenge is even greater when compounded by the complexities of a diverse multi-lingual or low-income population base.  In one community, a group of students at an alternative high school engaged their neighbors to provide meaningful input into a transportation planning process.  Learn how this collaborative effort led to a meaningful win-win community dialogue that not only provided valuable input for planners, but cultivated life-long lessons for students, family members, school administrators and the broader community at-large.  Learn how these lessons learned could be applied to other public involvement strategies.

 

New Approaches to Including People with Disabilities in Public Participation, Ann Kirkwood, Senior Research Associate, Idaho State University
If the location is wheelchair accessible…have you done enough? This session offers detailed and practical approaches for involving people with disabilities in consultation processes. It provides concrete tips and techniques to create welcoming environments for the beginner to the advanced public participation practitioner. Participants will understand disability issues, learn practical methods and insights on how to meaningfully include people with disabilities, identify the need for and value of involving people with disabilities in mainstream public participation processes, detect personal attitudes and perceptions as possible barriers to full participation, and develop skills to implement learned techniques.

A Citizenry Inclusive Program – The Okulu Carnival 2005,  Mrs. Olufunmilayo Egbeoluwa, CEO of Tremdox, Nigeria Limited         
The Okulu Carnival engendered the spirit of belongingness and fostered unity among the Ilaro People.  It constituted an outing for exchange of ideas, dialogue, interpersonal communication, re-union, formation of new contracts and solidifying old ones.  It presented opportunities for self-expression at best as many people danced and san openly and beautifully with traditional drummers displaying unique skills in drumming. Participants included representatives of Civic Societies, Commerce and Industry, Politics, Business, Youth, Elderly Communities, Able and Disabled persons.

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