2007 Board of Directors Elections
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Anne Carroll
St. Paul, Minnesota, USA
IAP2 member since: 2002

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?

I’m a 20+ year strategic planner and public involvement consultant serving the public sector. Recent projects: community visioning, university strategic planning, and park district visioning/strategic planning (see website). I specialize in bringing underrepresented voices to the table, teach P2 design to graduate students, and train in inclusive P2 design and online tools.

Why is public participation important to you?

Because it’s the right thing to do in a democracy. My grad school focus was on policy process/decision making; as I gained experience and P2 evolved as a field, I aligned my beliefs and ethics more closely with my work and shifted my emphasis to designing, implementing, and teaching  inclusive, innovative, effective P2.

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

 These vary by location/sector/subfield, but include:

·        Successfully navigating ethical challenges in P2 practice

·        Authentically engaging underrepresented people

·        Communicating the importance of P2 design and responsible funding

·        Public knowing their rights/roles in public decisions

·        Providing, promoting leading-edge professional development, training, and teaching for experienced practitioners and newcomers

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

·        Conference presenter

·        Pre-conference Tier II trainer

·        Chapter-sponsored trainer (inclusive P2 and online tools)

·        IJP2/Journal Advisory Committee

·        Conference Committee

·        Professional Development Committee

·        Training Quality Control/Quality Assurance Committee

·        Training Academy Candidate/Application Review Team

·        Training Academy Evaluation Team

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

I am initially well suited to support the service group because of my extensive committee work with the training program (as a non-trainer) and the Journal. I’m also interested in helping with governance issues, as I have extensive board experience and resources, serve as an elected official, and have lived and traveled internationally.

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

·        Providing quality services that are needed/desired by members around the world, while staying financially sound

·        Expanding the practitioner base, and IAP2 membership, to reflect/represent the diverse, international public we serve

·        Aligning internal policies/practices/governance with core values

·        Remembering the importance of having fun while we’re doing good work, well


Dr. Lyn Carson
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
IAP2 member since: 2002

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?

I’ve been involved in the field of public participation field since 1991 when I was elected to local government in regional Australia (Lismore City Council 1991-1995) on a platform of citizen involvement in political decision making. I experimented at that time with some P2 innovations, because I wanted to find ways to capture the voices that are typically missing from community consultation. I developed a healthy obsession through this experience with the cultivation of active citizenship. During that time I completed a PhD entitled “How do local government decision makers respond to public participation?”. The short answer is, not very well, and my current research, teaching and writing reflect my continued curiosity about why this is so.  My inquiry has led to some great opportunities, e.g. being commissioned by state planning authorities to write various handbooks on innovative consultation methods. In 2001, one of these handbooks, Ideas for Community Consultation, was distributed, by the former Department of Urban Affairs and Planning (DUAP), to all local councils throughout NSW (an Australian state), to assist with the implementation of DUAP’s PlanFirst.

I’ve written extensively on the subject of citizen involvement in policy making. My work includes a book, dozens of articles and four handbooks which describe principles and procedures for effective citizen participation (including how to convene citizens’ juries, youth juries and residents’ feedback registers or people’s panels). I’ve also participated in many examples of active democracy—for example Australia's first consensus conference, Australia's first two deliberative polls, a number of citizens' juries and a youth jury, and a combined citizen's panel and televote. I maintain an active democracy website: www.activedemocracy.net 

I currently teach two postgraduate course: Politics of Consultation and Dialogue, Deliberation & Public Engagement (the latter is a collaborative program with Fielding Graduate University, Santa Barbara—this year with participants from five countries learning together online, face-to-face and by phone—a delightful program). I also supervise doctoral students who are undertaking original research in this field. I’m currently completing research both in Australia and internationally that includes the compilation of an inventory and audit of democratic deliberative processes in Australia as well as working in partnership with international practitioners and academics; one project is with IAP2’s research working party (I’ve been a member since this group began) and the other with the Deliberative Democracy Consortium.

Why is public participation important to you?

I’m fascinated by the potential that genuine democratic practice offers us all. I’ve written in the area of random selection (e.g. a book with Brian Martin Random Selection in Politics, Praeger, 1999) and routinely use randomness to ensure inclusive P2 processes (I also work as a consultant process designer for government departments and non-government organisations). Janette Hartz-Karp and I have written about the three ideals of P2: inclusion (or representativeness), deliberation and influence. Random selection helps with the former though the remaining two ideals can obsess me equally. I’ve experimented over the years with many group processes that deepen deliberation and I’ve worked with contracts (between citizens and sponsoring agencies) to improve citizens’ influence over political decision makers.

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

One of the biggest challenges faced by P2 is being understood. It is easy to understand the content of an issue but many people, including decision makers, find it difficult to understand process. Even the language can be confounding. I think we, P2 community members, under-estimate this translation challenge. Also, achieving buy-in from elected representatives and policy administrators is a big challenge. I’m writing a little about this issue right now. I would like to see some research activity in relation to cost/benefit of P2 as well and I’ve begun to explore this in a collaborative research project that is just beginning. The field generally is ripe for growth. One of the best things about being involved with international networks like the Deliberative Democracy Consortium is being amongst a group of scholars and practitioners whose raison d’etre is to identify the research gaps and to initiate research that is driven by practitioners’ needs.

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

I was an active member of the organising group for IAP2’s Homebush Asia-Pacific conference (2005) plus keynote speaker and a workshop convenor at that conference. I was a keynote speaker and workshop convenor of a World Café at IAP2’s conference in Melbourne (Sept 07). I’m regularly invited to speak at IAP2 meetings—invitations that I readily accept because I appreciate the collaboration that can occur between community and university practice. I’ve been a member of IAP2’s international research working party since its inception. I have been actively involved in the research design of the current Kettering-funded IAP2 project, Painting the Landscape: A Cross-Cultural Exploration of Public-Government Decision Making, as well as regional coordinator (Australasia) for that project; I’m still involved with data analysis and completion of that project. I invite IAP2 members as guest lecturers to my university courses and regularly collaborate with IAP2 members on projects and workshops. I have linked IAP2 in various ways to compatible networks—e.g. Deliberative Democracy Consortium, Journal of Public Deliberation and written about the importance of these networks (see Journal of Public Deliberation).

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

I’m attracted to membership, especially ways of involving members in IAP2 activities. I’m interested in democratisation of organisations as well. I’m rather smitten by the idea of drawing members randomly, in a lottery, and inviting them to join the Board. This is done by organisations such as Shared Interest Society and the National Lotteries in the UK and avoids the sort of ‘tap on the shoulder’ invitations that can happen with committee membership. These organisations have found that the results are inspiring with new energy, new ideas and new perspectives introduced to discussions.

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

IAP2 has begun to link well with research communities such as universities and think tanks. I’d like to see tighter links with scholarly research so that practice is informed by empirical and theoretical research and research is informed by practice. This is happening elsewhere (e.g. Deliberative Democracy Consortium) and I’d like to see more of this for IAP2 (without reinventing the wheel). By linking with other networks and carefully selecting gaps in our knowledge, we can make a great contribution to both our members and the field of deliberative democracy (which overlaps with P2 practice). I also think there is potential for greater internationalisation (since such fabulous P2 is happening in places like Brazil and Venezuela); I know that this growth is happening already and I’m really pleased to see the increased diversity that is occurring.


John Godec
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
IAP2 member since: 1992

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?  

I have been conducting authentic public participation since 1991 first as the Communication Director for a State environmental regulatory agency then later as a member of the public involvement team for an international consulting firm, then as Director of Issues Management for Motorola Corporation, and now as a consultant to both government and business.  With my own firm I have consulted and coached public participation full time and internationally since 2000. 

Why is public participation important to you?

Public Participation is important to me for reasons that begin with my fundamental values and beliefs, but perhaps more importantly because it is quickly becoming the only way to make truly sustainable decisions, especially related to difficult public policy issues.  

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

Public participation is challenged globally by the increasingly pervasive disconnect between government and those that are governed. Connections and communication between the two are now ruled by carefully packaged and tested statements and 8-second sound-bites. Decisions are too often made by people with the most influence and power at the moment and too infrequently based on sound public policy and reason.   

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

I am a life member and an ‘almost’ charter member of IAP2, I have participated in every IAP2 conference except the first, I’ve crafted courses and talks and presented at numerous conferences, I am an author of the IAP2 certificate course, a master trainer, member of the training committee and revamp teams, and a charter member of the Grand Canyon Chapter.  

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

As a communicator with more than 30 years (gasp!) of experience in media, advertising, crisis and issue management, public participation and relations, conflict resolution and management I think I can help this organization define its role and future. I believe that I can help IAP2 best in membership and services.  

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

Membership - IAP2 has maintained approximately the same number of members for several years in spite of the organization’s ongoing global expansion and thousands of people who have completed the IAP2 Certificate training. Influence – More and more people such as Paul Hawken (Blessed Unrest) and Al Gore (The Assault on Reason) point to evidence that suggests a growing number of groups and institutions that are confronting problems outside of the common view of politics and media.  Just imagine the role that IAP2 can play in the future.     


Wendy Green Lowe
I
daho Falls, Idaho, USA
I
AP2 member since:  1992

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field? 

I started doing public participation work in 1987.  I specialize in planning and implementing public participation projects for federal, state, and local government agencies.  I particularly enjoy working at the collaborate level of the IAP2 Spectrum on controversial issues, including sensitive species conservation and nuclear waste management. 

Why is public participation important to you? 

I believe that public decisions are improved through the engagement of the broader community.  Government agencies may have technical expertise, but often lack understanding of the public’s values and interests.  Decisions made without public engagement are often vulnerable to public criticism.  Participatory decisions result in better, more sustainable decisions. 

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

Realizing the potential of public engagement requires optimism on the part of the decision-maker, public, and P2 practitioner.  Yet we do our work in a hectic, distracting world.  Even when people care deeply about a public issue, getting them to participate in a thoughtful manner is not getting easier. 

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)? 

I was president for the Intermountain Chapter from 1995-2003.  I helped develop the IAP2 Certificate Program.  I have served on the Board of Directors, chairing the Training Program since 2003.  I am eager to turn my attention to other strategic initiatives as IAP2 continues to grow and address our members’ needs. 

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how? 

I am most interested in helping the organization to expand its membership base in new geographic areas around the world.  This will require agility and flexibility as we learn more about the needs of practitioners throughout the world and help the organization to meet those needs. 

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change? 

I would like to see IAP2 more actively promote our Core Values and more effectively raise the professional standards for our practice throughout the world.  I think we need to develop a deeper understanding of how we can customize our approaches to fit other cultural traditions throughout the world. 


Joana Janiw
Paris, France
IAP2 member since: 2006

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?

In 2005, began learning about public participation through local communicators' network. Member: Ministry's P2 Reflection Group.  My personal commitment includes 2 years of introducing IAP2 to other French practitioners, encouraging them to build a French community of practice which may one day soon become an IAP2 chapter (or more).

Why is public participation important to you?

Its how you make the best decisions, because people understand what's going on, and are allowed to express themselves about it. This is a collective intelligence exercise. P2 is how I perceive democracy could be at its most efficient. It contributes to everyone’s welfare and involvement.

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

I would say educating citizens about P2...and also educating top decision makers.  An association like IAP2 is one of the links between the two of them, and we should work on giving them enough common elements so that they understand each others requirements.

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

In February, I organized meetings between IAP2 trainer representative, myself and leading French practitioners; in May for IAP2’s president and president-elect; followed by July meeting with French P2 “stakeholders management” agency slated to organize IAP2 training in France in 2008.  My IAP2 activities have been self-funded, including attending the Montreal Conference.

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

This would be “emerging markets”, because I'm French and want to try to build an IAP2 chapter-affiliate in my own country...but I would also continue to promote IAP2 to other French speaking and European practitioners.

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

IAP2 is a large and innovative network. I think it could still improve its networking capabilities by capitalizing on member's experience and then producing and sharing common tools extracted from this experience. IAP2 should continue to try to increase its presence in Europe.


Terry Koch
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
IAP2 member since:  1993

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?

I have working and volunteering in the P2 field for 24 years.  A majority of my work has been in local government including serving as an Executive Assistant in the Mayor’s Office.  I was also a Public Affairs Manager with an energy company, self-employed consultant and now am a Senior Associate with Stantec Consulting, a professional design and consulting services firm.

Why is public participation important to you?

I firmly believe in the IAP2 Core Values. I incorporate the Core Values into all the P2 processes I design and implement.  Core Value #1 and #6 included below best ‘speak’ to why I feel public participation is important.   

Public participation is based on the belief that those who are affected by a decision have a right to be involved in the decision-making process.

Public participation provides participants with the information they need to participate in a meaningful way.

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

Shortage of well trained, skilled and enthusiastic practitioners in certain geographic and/or specific industry sectors.

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

  • 10 years service on the Wild Rose Chapter Executive – membership growth, training, networking, President, etc.
  • 2/3 Tier training courses completed
  • Facility and Logistics Chair, Banff 1999 International Conference
  • Training Academy Planning Committee member – Kananaskis Training Committee
  • 2005 - 2007 Training Evaluation Committee
  • active participation in 9 International Conferences

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

Membership – ensure existing members receive the services they are requesting in a timely and effective manner.  Increase membership in a strategic, staged approach.

Services – especially training and research services.  I am also interested in being considered for Treasurer position role starting in 2009

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

I feel this is a question for the membership to collectively answer.  My personal feeling is that we need to attract and train 18 – 30 year old practitioners in all corners of the globe to ensure the P2 profession grows, is effectively managed and adapts to changing conditions.  The public deserves no less. 


Betsy McBride
Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA
IAP2 member since: 2001

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field? 

Since 1992 with the public involvement label.  Before that as a grassroots environmental organizer.

Samples – as contractor – wrote plan and “Public Participation Principles” for Western Governors’ Assn.; paid reviewer for public participation sufficiency in federal clean-up projects; speaker – federal panels on public participation; non-profit leadership – co-founder of emerging Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement; city project manager – 2007 national winner for community deliberation project.

Why is public participation important to you?

I believe that democratic theory calls for citizens to be at the center of public decision making and that we must nurture and practice “the habits of democracy” for our system to live and thrive.   As a practical matter, networked communities work better – particularly under stress - and feel better.  I want to live in a world that believes in the right of citizens to determine their futures. 

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

Having enough decision makers know what authentic public participation looks and feels like.    There is a great deal of activity labeled as public participation that is really closer to public relations.  There must be a broader understanding of the “why” in this work and what it is for.     

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

Presentation at annual conference, attendance at three national conferences, participation on chapter organizing phone calls, signed up for “standards” committee, general sharing of information.

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

I have worked on the first three areas in other volunteer leadership positions.  For example, as state president of the Colorado League of Women Voters for 3 years, I had oversight responsibilities for board work, development, program, 22 local leagues, the paid lobbyist and office staff, publications, etc.     

I have been doing that kind of work, as a volunteer, since college.    My father told us “don’t measure a man by what he does for money, measure a man by what he does for free.”

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

It has been hard to get plugged in as a general member.  Beth Offenbacker’s organization of Mid-Atlantic chapter conference calls has been a satisfying opportunity to feel connected.  It is surprising that we haven’t done a better job of finding methods for more members to feel invested in their organization.  I know that there are really interesting members doing good groundbreaking work.  It would be good to know more of them.


Matt McKinley
Helena, Montana, USA
IAP2 member since:  1996

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?

I have worked in the fields of public participation and public dispute resolution for nearly 25 years. I provide nonpartisan facilitation and mediation services; serve as a coach, mentor, and consultant; teach workshops and courses; conduct policy-relevant and evaluative research; and have founded and directed two organizations dedicated to improving public participation and public policy.

Why is public participation important to you?

I believe that meaningful, effective public participation results in public decisions that are widely supported; saves time and money when compared to lobbying, litigation, and other ways of shaping public policy or resolving public disputes; effectively integrates social and political values with scientific and technical considerations; and makes implementation easier because the public has helped shape the proposed policy.

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

I think there are two related challenges. The first one is the need to build the capacity of citizens to effectively engage in public dialogue and public decisions. The second challenge is to reform existing institutions and professional norms to make them more supportive of meaningful, effective public participation.

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

I have participated in two or three annual conferences, and have served on the board of advisors for the Intermountain Chapter for the past 3 years. We recently submitted a two-part article for publication in the new International Journal on Public Participation.

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

I am willing to serve in any capacity. I am increasingly interested in learning more about the international aspects of our work, so working with “emerging markets” would be productive. I am also willing to contribute to the “services” working group, particularly in the areas of research and training.

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

Following my response to question 3, I believe that we need to build the demand for more meaningful, effective public participation. This challenge not only requires us to build the capacity of citizens and reform existing institutions, but also to instill the core values of IAP2 into the next generation of leaders.


Robert Nurick
Brighton & Hove, East Sussex, United Kingdom
IAP2 member since:  2007

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?

FOR THE LAST 15 YEARS I HAVE CONDUCTED PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH AND CO-DESIGNED AND RUN ACCREDITED TRAINING PROGRAMMES IN COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN THE UK, AFRICA AND SOUTH/ SOUTH-EAST ASIA.

Why is public participation important to you?

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PROVIDES ONE WAY THAT DIFFERENT PEOPLE IN COMMUNITIES CAN EXPRESS THEIR VIEWS AND CONCERNS AND HAVE THEIR VOICES HEARD. APATHY AND DISENGAGEMENT BY MANY SECTIONS OF THE COMMUNITY IN THE DEMOCRATIC PROCESS HIGHLIGHTS THE NEED FOR MORE DELIBERATIVE FORMS OF DEMOCRACY.

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

ONE CHALLENGE IS HOW TO DESIGN PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PROCESSES THAT ARE SEEN AS CREDIBLE BY YOUNG PEOPLE AND WILL ENCOURAGE THEM TO TAKE PART. ANOTHER MAJOR CHALLENGE IS HOW PUBLIC PARTICIPATION CAN BE USED TO ADDRESS THE EXCLUSION OF PARTICULAR ETHNIC AND RELIGIOUS GROUPS.

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

I HAVE BEEN CLOSELY INVOLVED IN SUPPORTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN IAP2 PRESENCE IN THE UK.  I AM WORKING WITH A GROUP IN THE UK TO PREPARE FOR THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE TO BE HELD IN GLASGOW IN 2008. I AM ABOUT TO COMPLETE MY PRACTICUM AND BECOME LICENSED AS AN IAP2 TRAINER.

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

SERVICES – DEVELOPMENT OF TIER 2 COURSES FOCUSING ON COMMUNITY-CAPACITY-BUILDING; ENGAGING CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE. DEVELOPING RESEARCH AGENDAS AROUND FORMS OF DELIBERATIVE DEMOCRACY TO PROMOTE DIALOGUE, TRUST AND RESPECT IN MULTI-ETHIC SOCIETY.

EMERGING MARKETS – WORKING TO ESTABLISH IAP2 CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME AS A KEY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TOOL FOR THOSE INVOLVED IN P2 IN THE UK.

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

TO CONTINUE THE PROCESS OF EXPANING INTO EUROPE, AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN  – SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, ASIA AND CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA;

TO WORK TOWARDS GREATER ETHNIC DIVERSITY IN IAP2 MEMBERSHIP;

TO ENSURE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PROCESSES ENABLE THE ENGAGEMENT OF THE MOST MARGINALISED AND ‘HARD-TO-REACH’ GROUPS WITHIN SOCIETY.


Gale Simpson
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
IAP2 member since:  1999

How long have you been doing public participation work and in what capacity/ies do you serve in this field?


My first ever public participation program dates back to the mid 1970’s(!) at a time when the Alberta government was embarking on a new initiative to offer school lunch programs in aboriginal communities in the northern part of the province.  My involvement in that program set the course for my career path and I haven’t strayed from the communications/community relations field.  Since 1999, I have been working exclusively in public participation as an independent consultant in Calgary, Alberta. 

Why is public participation important to you?

Public participation makes life worthwhile for me.  Although it has its challenges, the many joys I get from doing this work are worth every single minute I put into doing it.  It’s just that simple!

What do you think is the most important challenge we face in public participation work at this time?

Continuous improvement of the practice is our most important challenge.  The IAP2 certificate program has given literally thousands of practitioners, not just the basic tools to develop programs, but also an international set of standards and ethics to guide them.  However, there are so many people who are practicing without this knowledge and we must strive to reach them to continuously improve the practice.

In what ways have you served to support the growth and development of IAP2 (committee work, presentations at annual conferences, chapter activities, etc)?

I have been a committed member of IAP2 since 1999.  In that time I have attended four annual conferences and have delivered one session.  I completed the Certificate Training Program and in 2005 became a certified trainer.  I have been a very active member of the local Wild Rose Chapter since 2001, serving in the capacity of Communications Director for five years and currently as Vice President. 

In which of the Board’s four strategic working groups (membership, funding, services, emerging markets) do you feel your experience and interests could be put to best use and how?

I see the services working group as a very good fit for me.  As a licensed trainer, I have a great deal of interest in the training we provide, and its possibilities for the future.

What are the areas in which you think IAP2 needs to grow and change?

In addition to growing the membership in other parts of the world, I think we need to focus some of our attention on what value added services we can provide to our members.  Some thoughts I have include:  a member accreditation program which speaks to maintaining a high level of credibility; and an enhanced program of advanced training opportunities – possibly courses that could be completed online, making them more accessible to interested parties.

 

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